Eco Kids Fighting Climate Change in Britain

Posted on December 16, 2009. Filed under: News | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Here’s an interesting listen from today’s NPR Morning Edition. The story is about kids in British schools taking the lead in fighting climate change by learning about the topic and designing programs to cut their own carbon footprint. The students are supported by the Eco-Schools program which helps get kids involved as eco-reps that track energy use, encourage sustainable commuting and promote recycling. Also mentioned in the story were schools making use of renewable energy including wind and solar for on-site, clean power generation. Another idea for the teenage crowd carbon dating–students meet up and go on low carbon dates such as taking bike rides or eating local vegetarian food.

As the story points out, this type of action is not a substitute for clear government policy to cut carbon emissions. Still, education early on helps make low carbon living a natural habit for kids and is changing the mindset of future generations towards environmental stewardship.

Schools in our area are also working to integrate climate change and renewable energy into their curriculum. Earlier this week, Clean Currents attended the  unveiling of a 111KW solar installation at the Bullis School in Potomac, MD. Not only will the installation provide 20% of the electricity needs for the Blair Arts Center, the largest building on the Bullis campus, but it will also serve as a learning tool to teach kids about solar power and climate change. Here’s a video from Monday’s event:

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